News Blog for Seattle's University District Neighborhood

 

Entries from June 2017

CELEBRATE 4TH OF JULY WITH A BLOOD DONATION!

June 29th, 2017 by sarawilly

Supply dips sharply with schools out, donors on vacation

Fireworks, hot dogs, parades, families, history, American heroes – these are the memories of every Fourth of July. This year, add blood donation! What better way to help your community than by helping fellow Americans depending on blood to survive?

“Donating blood takes only an hour of your time, and has the potential to save up to three lives,” notes James P. AuBuchon, MD, president and CEO of Bloodworks.

Summer is a challenging time for maintaining the local blood supply, with schools and colleges on break, and donors on vacation. “We’re already at the point where inventories of the most-needed blood types are nearing critical levels – meaning we have only a two or three day supply,” AuBuchon said.

All 12 Bloodworks donor centers will be open on Tuesday July 4th for whole blood donations and apheresis collections (platelet, plasma and double red cell). Donors can schedule an appointment at any Bloodworks donor center by going online at schedule.bloodworksnw.org or by calling 1-800-398-7888. People can also can check online at bloodworksnw.org to find dates and times of mobile drives close to where they live or work.

The need for blood is continuous throughout summer to support patients having surgeries, organ transplants and cancer treatment. It takes about 800 donors a day to maintain a sufficient supply for more than 90 hospitals served by Bloodworks in Washington, Oregon and Alaska.

“To avoid a summer crunch, we’re asking people who haven’t donated recently to celebrate the 4th by giving blood, or by scheduling an appointment during the next two weeks,” AuBuchon said.

There is a special need for O blood type, platelets, and AB plasma – but all donors are welcome.

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Seattle Youth Commission now accepting applications

June 20th, 2017 by sarawilly

By Hilary U at our sister site Wedgwoodview

The City of Seattle is now accepting applications for the Seattle Youth Commission (SYC), a commission of 15 Seattleites ages 13-19 that address issues of importance to youth. Appointed by the Mayor and Seattle City Council, youth serving on this commission get a unique opportunity to work with elected officials, City staff, community leaders, and young people citywide to make positive changes in their communities through policy, organizing, and events. The deadline to apply is Monday, July 17 at 5:00 p.m.

Youth serving on the commission will be required to attend a half-day retreat on Saturday, September 23, bi-monthly SYC meetings, and additional committee commitments.  The commission meets the 1st and 3rd Wednesdays of each month at Seattle City Hall from 4:30 – 6:00 p.m. Commissioners serve a two-year term beginning in September 2017 and ending June 2019.

In addition to representing youth across the city, commissioners receive hands-on experience in the public sector and learn how to cultivate the youth voice in city policy.

To apply, click here or complete this application and submit:

Via email: seattleyouthcommission@seattle.gov
Via postal mail: Seattle Department of Neighborhoods, c/o Seattle Youth Commission, PO Box 94649, Seattle WA 98124-4649
In person: Seattle Department of Neighborhoods, located in City Hall, 600 4th Avenue, 4th floor

Interviews will be held on August 7 and 9 from 4 – 6 p.m.

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Woodland Park Zoo giraffe gives birth

June 20th, 2017 by sarawilly

By Doree at our sister site phinneywood.com

Early this morning, Woodland Park Zoo’s 8-year-old giraffe, Tufani, gave birth. The calf’s gender has not yet been determined. It will be examined for the first time tomorrow to identify gender, height and weight.

Photo by Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren, Woodland Park Zoo.

Mom and baby are currently off view in the barn to allow for nursing and bonding. After 72 hours, staff will turn on the giraffe cam. The calf is expected to start following its mom to the outside enclosure within a week or two.

The calf will be named later this summer.

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Hiding in Plain Sight-New Species of Flying Squirrel Discovered at the Burke

June 12th, 2017 by sarawilly

From the Burke Museum of Natural History:

For hundreds of years, a species of flying squirrel was hiding right under (actually, above) our noses.

A new study published in the Journal of Mammalogy describes a newly-discovered third species of flying squirrel in North America— Humboldt’s flying squirrel, Glaucomys oregonensis. It inhabits the Pacific Coastal region of North America, from southern British Columbia to the mountains of southern California. Until now, these coastal populations were simply thought to be the already-known northern flying squirrel.

“For 200 years we thought we had only had one species of flying squirrel in the Northwest—until we looked at the nuclear genome, in addition to mitochondrial DNA, for the first time,” said study co-author Dr. Jim Kenagy, curator emeritus of mammals at the Burke Museum and professor emeritus of biology at the University of Washington.

Biologists used to classify the flying squirrels of California and the coastal Pacific Northwest as northern flying squirrels. It wasn’t until co-author Dr. Brian Arbogast, associate professor of biology at the University of North Carolina Wilmington, and formerly a postdoctoral researcher at the Burke Museum, looked closely at the genetics of flying squirrel specimens from the Burke’s collections that it became apparent that they may be a different species. Flying squirrels collected since the early 1900s in the Pacific Coast region often looked smaller and darker than their counterparts from east of the Cascades.

Ultimately, it was DNA testing that revealed a third species unique to the Pacific Northwest.

The results of the DNA analyses were striking: they indicated that no gene flow was occurring between the Pacific Coastal form and the widespread, inland, continental form of the northern flying squirrel, even when two occurred together.

Kenagy, Arbogast, and other researchers spent years studying small mammals in the Northwest and how they distributed themselves in the western and eastern mountain ranges, as recently as the period following the last Ice Age.  In somecases, the eastern and western mammals evolved into different species over the past million years or so.

“It was a surprising discovery. We were interested in the genetic structure of small mammals throughout the Pacific Northwest, and the fact that in other cases we were aware that two different species had evolved in Eastern and Western Washington,” Kenagy said.

The new genetic study clearly demonstrates that Pacific Coastal populations of flying squirrels from Southern British Columbia, southward through western Washington and Oregon, and in California, now include members of the newly named species, Humboldt’s flying squirrel.

 

About Flying Squirrels:

The three species of flying squirrels in North and Central America are small, nocturnally-active, gliding squirrels that live in woodland habitats. These creatures don’t actually fly like bats or birds. Instead, they glide from tree-to-tree by extending furred membranes of skin that stretch from the forearm wrist, to the ankle on the hind leg. Their feather-like tail provides extra lift and also aids in steering. The gliding ability of flying squirrels is remarkable; they are capable of gliding for up to 100 meters and can make sharp, mid-air turns by using their tail as a rudder and moving their limbs to manipulate the shape and tautness of their gliding membranes.

This new discovery of the Humboldt’s flying squirrel is the 45th known species of flying squirrel in the world.

Images: (Top) The newly-described Humboldt’s flying squirrel is the third-known species of flying squirrel in North America. Photo by Nick Kerhoulas. (Bottom) Flying squirrel specimens from the Burke Museum’s collection were used to help identify the new species, Humboldt’s flying squirrel. Photos courtesy of the Burke Museum.

A map of the distribution of the new species and additional information can be found in this National Geographic article.

 

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Zoo to host after-work mixer, ‘Hoot for the Hood’

June 12th, 2017 by sarawilly

By Meghan Walker at our sister site My Ballard

Who said the zoo is just for kids? Woodland Park Zoo is taking advantage of its prime location amongst some of the hippest neighborhoods in town and is hosting an after-work “mix and mingle” for neighbors to meet one another, eat ice cream, and check out the zoo.

“Woodland Park Zoo is nestled between some of the hippest and most active neighborhoods in Seattle, and the zoo is excited to pay tribute to its supportive neighboring communities,” the organizers write.

The zoo will open up the Molbak’s Butterfly Garden and Microsoft Pollinator Patio exhibits for the mixer, to be held on Friday, June 23 from 6:30 to 8pm. To RSVP, register at zoo.org/neighbors. Evening parking for the event is free. For more info call  206-548-2500.

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Summer employment opportunity with United Way’s Summer Meals program

June 12th, 2017 by sarawilly

From our

United Way of King County’s Summer Meals Program is looking for workers to help children and teens access healthy meals throughout the summer.

Workers will be assigned to one or more Summer Meals sites – parks, libraries and community centers around King County – where teams will lead educational activities and deliver free meals to children. The full-time position will run from June 20 to August 26, and applications are open to those 18 years of age and older.

From the job description:

“You will plan and lead activities, serve meals, and conduct grassroots community outreach to get the word out. As a part of a federal program, you will ensure that the policies and procedures are followed, meals are accurately counted, and meals are prepared correctly. You will gain experience working directly with the community and in support of a respected and influential nonprofit. Training will be provided in site management, marketing, youth engagement and data tracking – hard skills that will make your summer work influential on your resume.”

The position pays a monthly stipend of $1,222, and a $1,194 AmeriCorps Education Award for student loans of future education.

According to United Way, in King County, 100,000 low-income children and teenagers rely on free or discounted meals during the school year, but less than 20% access free meals during the summer. There are 250 Summer Meals sites around the county; if you’re looking for free summer meals for kids in your neighborhood, text “food” to 877-877 (or “comida” for a reply in Spanish).

For more information and to apply, click here.

Photo courtesy United Way of King County

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